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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
battle for elephants. airs next wednesday on pbs. coming up, an olympian's day in court. we'll have a report from the trial of track star oscar pistorius and discuss fallen heroes. ahead on "now." i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. let's see what you got. rv -- covered. why would you pay for a hotel? i never do. motorcycles -- check. atv. i ride those. do you? no. boat. house. hello, dear. hello. hello. oh! check it -- [ loud r&b on car radi
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
're learning more about the troubled background of adam lanza. a new investigation by pbs finds that lanza was diagnosed with a sensory disorder, was very shy and liked being touched only by his mother. as for the exposure to guns, friends say lanza's mother nancy loved shooting because it helped her bond with her son. >> extraordinary reporting. this is kind of one of the summary graphs of the story, what emerges in this exploration of a still unfolding story is a portrait of a mother apparently devoted but perhaps misguided, struggling to find a place for her son in society. and a boy exceptionally smart in some areas, profoundly deficient in others, who never found a place in the world. >> it's just so sad because of the outcome of this. you think when you look at what happened in their life, you think if she had just made a different decision somewhere along the way, this could have been avoided. and everybody points to the guns, and that being the wrong decision that she made. but perhaps it's not the guns. maybe it's the type of help she got for her son and it wasn't adequate enough.
help society of "frontline," the pbs program that many of us watch and respect, detailed one woman's story in great detail. but that wasn't an isolated incident. the national prison rape elimination commission, created by congress, has said -- quote -- "as a group, immigration detainees are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse and its effects while detained. the prison rape elimination act of 2003, known as prea, was designed to eliminate sexual abuse of those in custody. it was bipartisan, championed by the late senator ted kennedy and senator sessions of alabama and i cosponsored it. prea required promulgation of national standards to prevent, detect and respond to prison rape in america. there have been questions raised about whether those standards would apply to immigration detainees. and as i've said before, when we drafted and passed prea, it was our intent it would apply to all in federal detention, including immigration detainees. i was pleased when president obama issued a memo clarifying that prea applies to all federal confinement facilities and directing agencies to a
're looking around in the 5% range here pb that will be healthy, 5% to 10%. >> how about you, rich? do you agree or do you have a different number? >> i think we're getting close to full value. earnings are coming in better than expected. two-thirds of companies reported sales. and i don't think this is the 2000 period where everybody is talking about stocks, joe. if we get past the sequester issues with sdwb either with a little bit of a pullback, not the 5% to 10% that the other guest is looking for, the markets are going to have to work higher. there's no other place to put your money right now. the 2% ten-year note doesn't have the competition when the s&p is yielding 2%. so we're still very constructive. and if earnings continue to come in better, we're going to have to raise our target. even though we may be a value in the short run, i still think stocks are the place to be and it's not a frothy market at all. >> because it's hard to get a return anywhere else. but, rich, what is your viewpoint on gdp this year? >> we're at roughly between 1.5% and 2%. >> and you don't think the mark
public service announcements featuring big bird set to run on several pbs stations next week. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging. >> joining me now for more on this, is leah goldman with "marie claire" magazine. >> we've seen the first lady enlist rachael ray to dr. oz and how would you rate the success of it? >> it's been a successful platform for the first lady, impressively so, i would say. she's seen some really significant results, actually, and typically you see first lady adopt these platforms and they go on the road with them and they do appearances for them, and we've actually seen some effects of this tour. for example, she's going out to mississippi, and since she started this let's move campaign, mississippi has seen a 13% drop of childhood obesity rate and that is the heaviest state in the nation so that's pretty impressive. >> let's look at poll numbers on the first lady. a poll taken two months ago shows that 73% of americans a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)